Founder's Welcome

The NVLD Project was inspired by my daughter who was diagnosed with having Non-Verbal Learning Disability at the age of five.

My daughter has faced many substantial challenges growing up but she has nonetheless persevered. Through a remarkable ability to be both tenacious and resilient, she has managed to succeed in many areas of her life. Like most, though, with this learning disability, my daughter will never be completely free of NVLD's hold.

Having any disability is challenging, particularly when that disability, like NVLD, is not officially recognized, is poorly understood, and presents significant social barriers. Too often individuals with NVLD are stigmatized and ostracized, largely because they misread social cues. Being accepted socially and feeling supported by a community remain among the biggest obstacles – a challenge we are addressing.

My daughter’s unwavering determination and courage inspired me to create a supportive and inclusive community to help children, adolescents, and adults with NVLD. 
In 2013 I founded The NVLD Project, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness, building support, and furthering our understanding of this disability. We are equally focused on creating helpful solutions to give those with NVLD the opportunity to live more fulfilling and productive lives where they can become fully integrated into mainstream society.

In just a few short years we have made considerable strides. I am very pleased and grateful that our organization is working with some of the most prominent experts in the field, including researchers, psychologists, educators, and their renowned institutions. Thanks to the support of so many individuals and organizations, my passion for providing much needed help and resources to others with NVLD and their families is becoming a reality. While I am extraordinarily proud of what we have accomplished so far, I do realize that in many ways our work has just begun. Please join me and all of us at The NVLD Project in our critically important work to attain a valid diagnosis for NVLD so that those living with this disability can be better understood, properly treated, socially engaged, and counted in.